Churches

With world-class performances, Amsterdam strikes all the right notes with classical music fans. Despite its relatively small geographical size, the city is home to more than 50 concert venues and theatres. You’ll find everything from symphony orchestras and ensembles to chamber music and opera in inspiring venues of all sizes.

We have arranged the PC Festival to be held at Amsterdam’s finest churches. Participating choirs will provide various performances, to which admission will be free.


Noorderkerk

Designed by architect Hendrick de Keyser and constructed in the early 1620s, this church boasts a geometrical sensibility consistent with the era’s humanist ideology. Its form is of a Greek cross, with four equidistant arms. The sanctuary, still used by the Protestant congregation, features large Tuscan pillars and a barrel-vaulted ceiling. At the juncture of the arms, a small tower crowns the exterior of the church and was executed by Hendrick Jacobsz Staets, town carpenter at the time.

Location: Noordermarkt 44 – 48

Noorderkerk


Oude Kerk

Oude Kerk
De Oude Kerk was is Amsterdam’s oldest building and oldest parish church, founded ca. 1213 and consecrated in 1306 by the bishop of Utrecht with Saint Nicolas as its patron saint. Sailors initially visited this place of worship to pray for a safe journey. It later acquired a reputation as also being a meeting point. There are approximately 10,000 people buried here, and several are worth mentioning: Rembrandt’s wife, Saskia van Uylenburgh, naval hero Jacob van Heemskerck and composer Jan Pieterszoon Sweelinck. When inside, look for a few special stained glass windows: the Mary Windows, the Mayors Windows and the Treaty of Munster Window.

Location: Oudekerksplein 23


Westerkerk

(“western church”) is a Dutch Protestant Church built in 1620-1631. Architect Hendrick de Keyser designed the church in a late Mannerist style also called “Amsterdam Renaissance.”  De Keyser helped to establish this style in the first half of the 17th Century. The Amsterdam Renaissance style deviates in many respects from sixteenth-century Italian Renaissance architecture. De Keyser did not adhere to the tenets of classical architecture as laid down in the Italian treatises.  The spire, called the Westertoren (“western tower”), is the highest church tower in Amsterdam, at 85 meters (279 feet). The crown topping the spire is the Imperial Crown of Austria of Maximilian I.

Location: Prinsengracht 281

Westerkerk


Begijnhof Kirche

Begijnhof
In the center of the lively Kalverstraat and Spui area is a hidden oasis: the Begijnhof. Concealed by the numerous houses and other buildings surrounding it, the area boasts a tranquil courtyard and charming chapel. Escape the busy city life and take a breather. The Begijnhof, which dates back to the fourteenth century, was originally home to a group of unmarried religious women called Beguines. These women were associated with the English Reformed Church (Engelsekerk). The last Beguine died in 1971. The church proudly displays panels that illustrate the Miracle of Amsterdam.

Location: Begijnhof 48


Zuiderkerk

The Zuiderkerk (“southern church”) is a 17th Century Protestant church and also designed by Hendrick de Keyser, who was buried in the church in 1621.  De Keyser designed the church as a pseudo-basilica in Gothic style, with a central nave and two lower side aisles, six bays long, with Tuscan columns, timber barrel vaults and dormers. The stained glass in the rectangular windows was later replaced by transparent glass. The richly detailed tower is a square stone substructure, on which an octagonal sandstone section stands with free-standing columns on the corners. On top of this is a wooden, lead-covered spire.

Location: Zuiderkerkhof 72

Zuiderkerk


Waalse Kerk

Waalse Kerk
The Waalse Church (Walloon church) is a Protestant church building in Amsterdam, along the southern stretch of Oudezijds Achterburgwal canal. The building dates to the late 15th century and has been in use as Walloon church since 1586. For more than 400 years, the church has been the domain of the Walloon Community, and every Sunday there is a service in French. The church is also used for concerts and music recordings. It is known for its excellent acoustics.

Location: Walenpleintje 159


De Duif

Until the mid-19th century public Catholic Church services were forbidden in Amsterdam. A so-called home-church sheltered behind the façade of the current De Duif Church on Prinsengracht. The church was built in 1858 as the Roman Catholic St. Willibrorduskerk designed by the architect Theo Molkenboer. The church has the neo classicist style and with a Neo-baroque front. From the opposite site of the canal one has a good view off this building.

Location: Prinsengracht 756

De Duif


Papegaai

Papagaai
Petrus and Paulus church,  is a Roman Catholic church built 1848 by Gerrit Moele jr. in early neo-Gothic style. It is also called De Papegaai (the parrot) because it was originally hidden in a garden behind a regular housefront that belonged to a bird-trader in the days when Catholicism could not be practised publicly. After the reformation, the ‘alteratie’ in 1578, Catholic churches in the Netherlands were forbidden any outward appearance of a Church.

Location: Kalverstraat 58


You can find the location of these churches on our city plan.

Comments are closed.